Tylototriton verrucosus

Chinadog

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I'm not brushed up on my Asian newt natural history [QUOTE}

Its hard to find info on the ecology of any of the Chinese species, it is in English language anyway, but this article from Caudata Culture gives a good idea how they live in this particular location. They do occur over a massive range though, so their habits may vary in other areas depending on rainfall etc. As I understand it they are even thought to hybridise with another species of Tylototriton in a very few places where their ranges overlap to produce what's been known as T. psudoverrucosus, but info is very hard to find.

Caudata Culture Articles - Field Observations of Tylototriton verrucosus
 
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Thank you sir! I will do some homework. :happy:
 

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Here are a few more comparison snaps from the last few days. They are all roughly the same length, but apart from that they could be mistaken for different species altogether!
The ones in with the adults are lightning quick and excellent hunters, while the others in their own tank are quite clumsy and would rather beg for food than have to catch it themselves. :)
The first three pics are the ones in with the adults, it will be interesting to see weather they all end up looking the same when they morph.
 

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SnotOtter

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That is crazy how different they look. Lovin this thread. Keep it comin. They have some amazing gills!
 

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This thread makes me so jealous this is my favourite species and I haven't had any luck finding some....keep the pics coming!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Chinadog

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I'm starting to see the first morphs in the T. verr larvae tank. I'm hoping they will stay in the water like my adults did, but there is a planted island if they want.
Meanwhile, in the adult's tank the craziness continues, although it looks like a terrible siphoning accident the hose was slowly refilling the tank from the purifier outside at the time, she just swam up there to check for worms I guess. :)
 

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Chinadog

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The larvae that had their own tank have now just about morphed, so I brought them inside where I can keep an eye out for bullying or cannibalism attempts. Up to now, apart from nipping the odd gills and tails off early on they've lived happily together, but given the way the adults treat each other, I thought I'd better keep an eye on them.
The two that live with the adults are still (huge) larvae and show no signs of changing just yet, they just seem to trundle about eating snails one after another, or wait patiently with the adults when its worm time. There's been no attempts by the adults to eat the babies, so I will leave the larvae in there in future I think, just like I do with the pyrrhos and alpines.
They really do look like baby dinosaurs at the moment with their disproportionately large heads and feet, I'm dying to set them next to some broken egg shells and take a pic so I could sell it to the tabloids as 'Real Jurassic park' :D
 

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Sith the turtle

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Nice! You don't know Jurassic Park until you see Green anole hatchlings, look just like mini raptors
 

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Gorgeous little things man. Crocodile newts in general are the cuttest big headed babies, think thats one of my favorite things about them. They look great.
 

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Yeah, I almost want to call them pups because they remind me of puppy dogs!
I kept three of this years babies in the end, the rest of them went to their new homes today. I was quite pleased to wave them bye, bye in the end, the nursery tank was pretty crowded and it was a constant battle stopping them trying to swallow each other tail first, a bit like spinning plates on sticks. :)
 

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Chinadog

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Some recent pics of them mating. I've read a lot of accounts that describe amplexus as part of their breeding behaviour, but I've not seen it with my animals. Has anyone else?
 

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Chinadog

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I haven't updated for a while, so I took some snaps of day to day life in the croc newt tank. There's just about every life stage in there as the moment, I love the giant gills on some of the overgrown larvae!
 

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