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UK non native amphibians

lims

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I read that there was also some in the north east at one point, dont know where, a mystery...
I've spoke to people that say they used to catch all kinds of different newts at a place near me, but I only observed smooth newts on my visit to the site, the site has seen alot of development around the surrounding habitat so I think this probably helped to reduce the newt population...
 

dario

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As a working ecologist we continually find non natives particularly in the south of england.

In the last week we have recorded the following species

Marsh Frog...very widespread

Edible Frog.. spreading

European Tree Frogs...??? possible on one of our sites but no photo yet.


I'd be interested in any others which forum users have come across in England

Hi, some studies argue that water frogs can be also native of England.
However I would like to see pictures of England Water Frogs if you have some!
Bye
 

Heorte

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The Rana pipiens in Bristol is very interesting- I've heard rumours that these turned up at a southern university (possibly Bristol?) in the 1970s or 80s- I think they were quite commonly used as lab animals at that point, so it may just have been random escapes rather than an established colony.

http://www.alienencounters.org.uk/

I work at Bristol University just around the corner from from the pond the Rana pipiens were found. I think I may go see if I can find it and I'll let you all know what I find.

Ive been wanting to create a habitat that will attract native wildlife for a while my first attempt went down shamefully as I lined the pond I built with a black bag and then found out that the water would just seep through. I remember when I was in primary school I found a newt or a salamander (I was around 7 or 8 maybe younger so forgive my memory) If I was to try find native to my area newts or salamanders what would be the best technique to find them? where should I look in the Ponds or rivers? I don't ever remember seeing a wild newt or salamander anywhere else after the one in primary school so I think I'll have my work cut out. and If I was to find one would it be ok to bring it home and place it in a environment Ive prepared myself for it?
 

lims

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You generally don't find any newts in rivers as they prefer and breed in still water.

I would never take an amphibian out of it's habitat to put in my pond, anyone who does should keep it a secret on the forum, because it sends out a bad message.

If your garden is connected to countryside in any way you may get them naturally in your pond over time, if your surrounded by babylon's stay-fast secretions (urbanisation) you most likely will not get any naturally.

I dare say, If you do plan to collect some yourself you must make sure they are not great crested newts, it is against the law to disturb them in any way at all. You generally don't find any newts in rivers as they prefer and breed in still water.

In england we have 3 native newt species:

The fully protected great crested newt (Triturus cristatus), smooth newts (Lissotriton vulgaris), and palmate newt (lissotriton helveticus). You are taking nature into your own hands which arguably you should not do, if u collect the latter 2, but you are not breaking the law like with cristatus.

There are no native salamanders in the UK.
 

benw

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What an interesting thread.:lick:

There is a colony of Pool frogs near me and i found a good colony of Alpine newts (apuanus) near me too!




Ben
 

dario

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What an interesting thread.:lick:

There is a colony of Pool frogs near me and i found a good colony of Alpine newts (apuanus) near me too!




Ben

Can be very interesting for me if you can record the vocalisations and I can heard them; or some pics. In spring!:D
 

benw

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Dario

I stayed at Lake Trasimeno a few years ago and there were frogs calling all night, i assumed from the look of them that they were Pool frogs, although i could be wrong!

Will see what i can do for recording the croaks and pics too


Ben
 

crested

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Hi all

I was called out to visit a residential garden in Macclesfield on Sunday 12 October 2008 by the current owner who claimed to have found a large green newt while gardening earlier in the day. He had put the newt in a sealed container and wanted somebody to come and identify it.

As ususal I responded to the request and called round, within the hour, expecting to find the usuall smooth newt or posibly a GCN. Imagine my suprise when the green newt turned out to be a large female Triturus Marmoratus.

The day got more interesting when we started to search refugia around the garden for the 'small newts' he usually finds and within a few minutes we had found dozens of Alpine Newts (all ages and sizes) and two smooth newts.

It transpires that about six years ago the house was owned by a collector of Amphibians who apparently released or possibly kept several amphibian species including Marms and Alpines 'wild' in the garden where they appear to have been living and breeding ever since.

As the collector lived at this address for many years and given the high numbers of Alpines found it is likley that they and possibly other amphibian species could have been living 'wild' for a long time and may have colonised neighbouring gardens.

It appears likley that the Alpines and potentially Marms breed in the 5 small concrete lined ponds in the garden. Excellent shelter/cover is provided by extensive runs of dry stone wall that appear to have built within the garden especially for amphibians. There is also easy access for amphibians into neighbouring gardens.

With the agreement of the current owner of the house I plan further visits next spring and fully expect to find other 'exotic' species within the garden and its surrounds.

I will keep you posted of developments

Cheers

Jim
 

John

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That's really very interesting James. I imagine though that if the authorities find out they will be less than pleased.
 

aramcheck

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It transpires that about six years ago the house was owned by a collector of Amphibians who apparently released or possibly kept several amphibian species including Marms and Alpines 'wild' in the garden where they appear to have been living and breeding ever since.

As the collector lived at this address for many years and given the high numbers of Alpines found it is likley that they and possibly other amphibian species could have been living 'wild' for a long time and may have colonised neighbouring gardens.

The taxidermist for the Natural History Museum I used to work at used to have 3 ponds in his garden with marbled, alpine, smooth, palmate and GCN... (as well as tame badgers, hedgehogs bats, fox and an owl!!!) After his death in 2003, his widow had the amphibs removed and the ponds filled :eek:.

I wonder if they can be any remant of those populations in the neighbouring gardens...
 

Axel01

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There are two or three red eared terrapins living in the lake in the University Botanic Gardens in Cambridge. Probably dumped pets after the Mutant turtle craze.

As far as I was aware there was a single remaining native pool frog (Rana lessonae) living in Norfolk. I thought that there was a plan to introduce him to some pool frogs from Sweden
 

John

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There are two or three red eared terrapins living in the lake in the University Botanic Gardens in Cambridge. Probably dumped pets after the Mutant turtle craze.
If only they were confined to that lake :p. There are thousands of British records of Red Eared Sliders. Hopefully it'll never get warm enough for them to breed. As a child in Ireland I had 3 of these terrapins. I think they're great pets, but messy and relatively large. Now I live in Texas and they are pretty easy to come by (I see them crossing roads almost every time I am searching for salamanders during the warm parts of the year). I still like them, despite all the bad press they get.

As far as I was aware there was a single remaining native pool frog (Rana lessonae) living in Norfolk. I thought that there was a plan to introduce him to some pool frogs from Sweden
I think they're already doing that or have done it. I have a feeling we already talked about this though.
 

caleb

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There are two or three red eared terrapins living in the lake in the University Botanic Gardens in Cambridge. Probably dumped pets after the Mutant turtle craze.

As far as I was aware there was a single remaining native pool frog (Rana lessonae) living in Norfolk. I thought that there was a plan to introduce him to some pool frogs from Sweden

I'll look out for those next time I'm in Cambridge. As John says, red-ears are now quite widespread- for example, my parents have frequently seen them from their narrowboat at various sites in East Anglia and the Midlands.

The last native pool-frog failed to breed with the Swedish frogs, and died in 1999. Other pool frogs of Swedish origin have been released at a site in Norfolk close to the last known location- the first introductions were in 2005. The pool frog is now a protected species under the Wildlife & Countryside act.
 

Peter Parrot

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Midwife toads, several sightings an hours drive from me. More locally the occasional bombina, (no breeding known of).

I found xenopus tadpoles on the isle of wight 4 years ago.

We see the occasional north american colubrid here (escapees no doubt) and of course red eared sliders are at a few sites. HCT had a record submitted of a wall lizard, presumably podarcis muralis at a castle not too far away also, although how reliable a record this is I do not know.
 

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Have you really seen Alytes there? Do they breed?
 

Joeo1507

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I will tell you salamandra HAVE been sighted around wether or not they are breeding or just escapees is up to you to decide, I belive alpine newts and american bullfrogs Have been confirmed to be breeding in the uk in certain areas along with red eared sliders \
Tree frogs of all species have been sighted including whites tree frogs, how much of that is true I dont know.
Truth is theres been so much sighted too many to list.
 
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