Wild Encounters in WA

Exdraghunt

New member
Joined
Sep 3, 2020
Messages
14
Reaction score
11
Points
3
Location
Seattle, WA
Country
United States
Display Name
Ed
(Note: WA as in Washington State) I tend to come across amphibians and reptiles while out hiking or when building/working on hiking trails, and thought folks might appreciate hearing about my sightings and seeing some pics. I'll do my best to name species, but feel free to correct me if I am wrong

My profile pic is a Rough-Skinned Newt (Tarchia granulosa) that I came across while hiking in the North Cascades, on a trail that follows a river into Wilderness Land (so, Old Growth/Never Logged). The newt was actually sitting in the middle of the trail, so I picked it up to have a look before gently relocating it off-trail so the poor thing wouldn't get stepped on by somebody else. Unfortunately, the newt seemed a bit camera shy, so the pics I got are not the greatest.

Funnily, not long after I had an encounter with another Rough Skinned Newt who seemed to like chilling in the middle of busy trails. This time, a popular paved bicycle route. I noticed another cyclist stopped and holding something, so I stopped as well to see what she had found. The other cyclist said "I found this in the trail, I don't know what it is or what to do with it" and to my surprise, she had a newt in her hands. I told her she had a Rough Skinned Newt, and that it was the most toxic amphibian in the state, so she would probably want to go wash her hands. And that the little guy would be just fine if she set it in the wet grass off-trail. (Unfortunately, couldn't get close enough for pics because Covid and 6-feet and all that)
 

Attachments

  • IMG_8992.JPG
    IMG_8992.JPG
    7 MB · Views: 41
  • IMG_8994.JPG
    IMG_8994.JPG
    4.1 MB · Views: 33
  • IMG_9031.JPG
    IMG_9031.JPG
    4 MB · Views: 31
  • IMG_9032.JPG
    IMG_9032.JPG
    7.1 MB · Views: 30
Last edited:

Exdraghunt

New member
Joined
Sep 3, 2020
Messages
14
Reaction score
11
Points
3
Location
Seattle, WA
Country
United States
Display Name
Ed
Salamander time~! I was doing trail construction in a park out in the farmlands on a trail that circles a small lake. I was removing the Duff (aka: the organic soil layer) as we were cutting a new section of trail, and uncovered this little guy! I believe it is a Ensantina Salamander ( Ensatina eschscholtzii ). The salamander was quite quick and not happy to be held, so I snapped some pics as best I could before relocating it off-trail a safe distance from our work site. (Feat: my clawed gloves cause I love to dig in the dirt by hand)
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0822.JPG
    IMG_0822.JPG
    3.5 MB · Views: 26
  • IMG_0824.JPG
    IMG_0824.JPG
    3 MB · Views: 28
  • IMG_0825.JPG
    IMG_0825.JPG
    3.3 MB · Views: 29
  • IMG_0818.JPG
    IMG_0818.JPG
    6.5 MB · Views: 28
  • IMG_0829.JPG
    IMG_0829.JPG
    4.4 MB · Views: 24

Exdraghunt

New member
Joined
Sep 3, 2020
Messages
14
Reaction score
11
Points
3
Location
Seattle, WA
Country
United States
Display Name
Ed
When hiking through an urban park completely surrounded by housing developments, the last thing I expected was to come across a mole salamander! (The park is several hundred acres and contains wetland, but still an unexpected surprise) This Northwestern salamander (Ambystoma gracile) was just hanging out in the middle of the trail in the shade. Didn't mind at all when I laid down on the trail to get a low-angle shot, then I decided to leave the salamander alone to continue it's day.

In the same park, I also saw a garter snake that darted off only to watch me from the brush. And, exciting to me (a bird nerd. Birds are almost reptiles, right?) a juvenile Cooper's Hawk hanging about. I chased after the hawk for awhile trying to get a nice shot, but was only moderately successful.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_7053.JPG
    IMG_7053.JPG
    3.4 MB · Views: 29
  • IMG_7063.JPG
    IMG_7063.JPG
    3.8 MB · Views: 31
  • IMG_7064.JPG
    IMG_7064.JPG
    4.2 MB · Views: 29
  • IMG_7060.jpg
    IMG_7060.jpg
    144.2 KB · Views: 25
  • IMG_7062.jpg
    IMG_7062.jpg
    132.2 KB · Views: 21
Last edited:

MnGuy

Active member
Joined
Oct 16, 2016
Messages
208
Reaction score
31
Points
28
Country
United States
Beautiful pictures!
 

Exdraghunt

New member
Joined
Sep 3, 2020
Messages
14
Reaction score
11
Points
3
Location
Seattle, WA
Country
United States
Display Name
Ed
Thanks! I still argue with my camera from time to time to get it into macro mode, but I can usually get it to cooperate.
 

Exdraghunt

New member
Joined
Sep 3, 2020
Messages
14
Reaction score
11
Points
3
Location
Seattle, WA
Country
United States
Display Name
Ed
Western Washington, with our mild temperatures and rainy weather, is not a place that brings reptiles to mind. But, we do have them! And some of them, I don't even have to leave the city to see them.

Turtles are extremely common even in the middle of the city, primarily the invasive Red-eared slider. I can expect to see them out on any sunny day, sometimes in very large groups. (Native to the area, we have the Western Pond Turtle, and the Painted Turtle)

Of more surprise to me was to come across a lizard while hiking in an urban park. We have very few species of lizard in the Puget Sound basin (I think only 2 or 3) so I was very surprised to see a lizard sitting atop a log sunbathing right next to the trail. I threw out a hand and yelled "Wait!" to the person I was hiking with, then got as close as I could for a photo without scaring it. It is, I believe, a Northern Alligator Lizard, the Northwestern subspecies ( Elgaria coerulea principis )
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0521.JPG
    IMG_0521.JPG
    4.1 MB · Views: 23
  • IMG_4946.JPG
    IMG_4946.JPG
    4.4 MB · Views: 23
  • IMG_0828.JPG
    IMG_0828.JPG
    4.3 MB · Views: 22
  • IMG_0152.JPG
    IMG_0152.JPG
    4.2 MB · Views: 22
Last edited:

Exdraghunt

New member
Joined
Sep 3, 2020
Messages
14
Reaction score
11
Points
3
Location
Seattle, WA
Country
United States
Display Name
Ed
Today, I went out for a hike in some mature old-growth forest in the mountains. It wasn't raining, but that didn't stop every surface in the forest from dripping water. As I walked along, I idly flipped likely looking pieces of bark or rocks on the side of the trail, hoping for a salamander encounter. And I found one! A Western Redback Salamander ( Plethodon vehiculum ) who was chilling in the damp moss under some bark.

That was my only amphibian of the day, but while hiking out, I was surprised to see a Common Garter Snake ( Thamnophis sirtalis ) just hanging out next to the trail. I really loved the red speckling down the sides
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0218.JPG
    IMG_0218.JPG
    3.5 MB · Views: 17
  • IMG_0219.JPG
    IMG_0219.JPG
    3.3 MB · Views: 19
  • IMG_0220.JPG
    IMG_0220.JPG
    3.2 MB · Views: 21
  • IMG_0222.JPG
    IMG_0222.JPG
    4 MB · Views: 18
  • IMG_0229.JPG
    IMG_0229.JPG
    6.2 MB · Views: 18
  • IMG_0230.JPG
    IMG_0230.JPG
    2.6 MB · Views: 16
  • IMG_0231.JPG
    IMG_0231.JPG
    3.5 MB · Views: 17
  • IMG_0233.JPG
    IMG_0233.JPG
    3.9 MB · Views: 16

Exdraghunt

New member
Joined
Sep 3, 2020
Messages
14
Reaction score
11
Points
3
Location
Seattle, WA
Country
United States
Display Name
Ed
Urban amphibians? More likely than I thought!

After a full evening, and morning, of heavy rain, the sun made an appearance so I hopped on my bicycle and went down to one of the local parks. It contains a stormwater wetland, which is an artificial wetland created by the city to treat the city's stormwater via natural bio-filtration before it is discharged into the local river. I like to wander through it, especially after heavy rains. I wasn't too hopeful for any amphibian sightings, though, considering it's all untreated, raw stormwater pouring in. I was wrong!

I was only there about 5 minutes when I flipped a beaver-chewed piece of log and uncovered a Long-Toed Salamander! ( Ambystoma macrodactylum) Right next to the first section of water, where it's the least treated. Apparently, the city's stormwater isn't as disgusting as I assumed. I also heard frogs the entire time I was wandering around, but, alas, did not actually see any of them.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0236.JPG
    IMG_0236.JPG
    3.4 MB · Views: 18
  • IMG_0238.JPG
    IMG_0238.JPG
    3.2 MB · Views: 19
  • IMG_0241.JPG
    IMG_0241.JPG
    3.5 MB · Views: 17
  • IMG_0242.JPG
    IMG_0242.JPG
    3.5 MB · Views: 18
  • IMG_0243.JPG
    IMG_0243.JPG
    3.3 MB · Views: 21
  • IMG_0245.JPG
    IMG_0245.JPG
    5.2 MB · Views: 21
  • IMG_0247.JPG
    IMG_0247.JPG
    5.8 MB · Views: 17
Last edited:

Exdraghunt

New member
Joined
Sep 3, 2020
Messages
14
Reaction score
11
Points
3
Location
Seattle, WA
Country
United States
Display Name
Ed
I was out doing a work party today in a county park, digging some drainage channels on our first dry day after 3 solid days of rain. While walking to our work site, I decided to flip some nice logs beside the trail to see what was under them. I flipped a log, and saw something move underneath. I paused, seeing something that might be a stick, but almost might be a salamander tail. Then, it moved! A salamander!

Scooping up a handful of dirt, salamander included, I gave the animal a quick rinse and discovered that I had an Ensatina Salamander! ( Ensatina eschscholtzii) A delightful little find, I took the time to get some nice pics before letting it retreat back under its log.

In sharing my salamander tail with my fellow trail workers, I discovered that almost everyone seems to have a "Biggest salamander I ever saw!" story, presumably involving one of the Pacific Giant Salamanders around here. I have been promised pictures, and will post here if I get them.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0404.JPG
    IMG_0404.JPG
    1 MB · Views: 12
  • IMG_0408.JPG
    IMG_0408.JPG
    765.5 KB · Views: 12
  • IMG_0409.JPG
    IMG_0409.JPG
    918.6 KB · Views: 12
  • IMG_0411.JPG
    IMG_0411.JPG
    614.8 KB · Views: 11
  • IMG_0412.JPG
    IMG_0412.JPG
    667 KB · Views: 13
  • IMG_0414.JPG
    IMG_0414.JPG
    1.3 MB · Views: 13
  • IMG_0415.JPG
    IMG_0415.JPG
    563.3 KB · Views: 12
  • IMG_0416.JPG
    IMG_0416.JPG
    583.1 KB · Views: 13

Exdraghunt

New member
Joined
Sep 3, 2020
Messages
14
Reaction score
11
Points
3
Location
Seattle, WA
Country
United States
Display Name
Ed
Today, I was out in a county park helping put in a new stretch of trail. As we broke for lunch, the person working next to me yelled "Salamander!" and I rushed over to take a look. Sure enough, in the dirt in her worksite was a Long-toed Salamander (Ambystoma macrodatylum ) I gave the little guy a rinse and brought him out into the light, and quickly realized something odd. One of the salamander's eyes was dangling out of it's head! Over the eye socket was just a small scar, so apparently it is an older injury. The bad eye was just. hanging there. like a black marble stuck to the poor creature's head.

I briefly considered taking the salamander home, but it didn't seem to be acting oddly or bothered by the funky eye, and since it's healed up there's nothing I can do. So I instead carried him over to a nice rotten log a safe distance from our work site and wished him the best.

My other surprise of the day was an impressively enormous Pacific Sideband Snail. ( Monadenia fidelis ) Never seen one so big!
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0457.JPG
    IMG_0457.JPG
    1,022.7 KB · Views: 13
  • IMG_0459.JPG
    IMG_0459.JPG
    793.1 KB · Views: 14
  • IMG_0462.JPG
    IMG_0462.JPG
    993.2 KB · Views: 16
  • IMG_0463.JPG
    IMG_0463.JPG
    664.6 KB · Views: 15
  • IMG_0466.JPG
    IMG_0466.JPG
    1.3 MB · Views: 14
  • IMG_0439.JPG
    IMG_0439.JPG
    841.4 KB · Views: 14
  • IMG_0442.JPG
    IMG_0442.JPG
    966.6 KB · Views: 13
  • Compare.jpg
    Compare.jpg
    2 MB · Views: 13

Exdraghunt

New member
Joined
Sep 3, 2020
Messages
14
Reaction score
11
Points
3
Location
Seattle, WA
Country
United States
Display Name
Ed
As I talk with other people who do trail work in the area, I hear more and more "The biggest salamander I ever saw!" stories. Fortunately, one of those people took photos and shared them with me. These pictures come from someone who works with the Forest Service around Washington, and on a top clearing fallen trees from a hiking trail, she encountered this large amphibian specimen. From the pictures, I believe it is a Pacific Giant Salamander (Dicamptodon tenebrosus) Apologies for the quality, they were apparently taken with a flip phone camera.

I have my own "biggest salamander I ever saw!" story, but alas, I did not have a camera with me that day. I was helping remove a rotten bridge over a stream, and when I stepped into the stream to hook up one of the large logs to be winched out, something moved at my foot. It was a large salamander, around a foot long nose to tail-tip, and a pale, almost fleshy color. We tried to catch it, but kicked up too much silt in the stream and the creature vanished. (At that point, we broke for lunch in the hopes the salamander would evacuate our work area and indeed, we did not see it again.) I hope to go back up that hiking trail some time to see if I can find it again.
 

Attachments

  • GIANT 4.jpg
    GIANT 4.jpg
    400.4 KB · Views: 11
  • GIANT 3.jpg
    GIANT 3.jpg
    456 KB · Views: 11
  • GIANT 1.jpg
    GIANT 1.jpg
    561.2 KB · Views: 11
General chit-chat
Help Users
  • No one is chatting at the moment.
  • Chat Bot:
    ChocoUniversa has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • ellarose:
    +1
    Unlike
  • ellarose:
    Go to the fishless cycle tab :)
    +1
    Unlike
  • MidgetMan:
    @tduzz, where do you live? Like roughly. What country are you in?
    +1
    Unlike
  • tduzz:
    @MidgetMan, Massachusetts but I can give anywhere in the new England area
    +1
    Unlike
  • AMurry24537:
    @ChocoUniversa, Buy some ammonia and an eyedropper from Walmart and a water test kit for ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates. Figure out (through testing) how many drops it will take to get the ammonia level to the test's maximum measurement. Add that same number of drops every 24 hours. Eventually, the ammonia will start to go down as it's converted to nitrites. Keep adding ammonia. The nitrite levels will spike for a while and then they too will start to go down as they convert to nitrates. These you get rid of by doing water changes, which you should be doing anyway throughout the process. Once all of these are at low levels, your aquarium is ready. It takes about a month, maybe two (mine took a month and a half). Be sure to add ammonia until the day of or the day before you add your axolotl.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Kmia_13:
    Hey guys, this is my first time using this so bear with me. I have an adult axie who looks like he’s developed some fungus on gills. It’s still really small and only on one part. I put him in a 10 gal quarantine tank with an Indian almond leaf. I want to give him a black tea bath but not sure if I can add my black tea to the tank with the Indian almond leaf in there. Any advice?
    +1
    Unlike
  • Gillygills:
    Hi, My axolotl has just started morphing, but has some fungal spot behind the gill.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Gillygills:
    Should I fridge therapy and salt wash? or will this not be wise when she is morphing.
    +1
    Unlike
  • BChen3695:
    Need help identifying what’s wrong with my axolotl
    +1
    Unlike
  • Unlike
  • Unlike
  • madcaplaughs:
    @BChen3695, what are your parameters and temp? The fact that they're raised bumps could indicate fungus or bacterial infection.
    +2
    Unlike
  • XxJennXx:
    Hi! I have recently gotten a spotted salamander. Did some research and found lots of info, but just wondering if they brumate in captivity! Thank you to anyone who can answer this ☺
    +1
    Unlike
  • Pookisoo:
    Hello its urgent!
    +1
    Unlike
  • Pookisoo:
    I have a tiger salamander and i got him as a gift , recently it looks like something has been eating at his tail! Almost like its dissolving..? Ive checked that there is no other bugs in the closure, ive also ben giving him salt baths but its inly getting worse. Sorry if its much hahaha im just super worried!😓
    +1
    Unlike
  • afmtgn:
    Hi @Pookisoo it seems to be a fungal disease
    +1
    Unlike
  • MVM1991:
    @XxJennXx, I don't believe so. They are closely related to tigers and my tiger doesn't brumate. I think first year they might but after they see they aren't needing to, they should be good. They might try and hibernate to, mine did for the first year but now I see him crawling around right now.
    +1
    Unlike
  • XxJennXx:
    @MVM1991, ok thanks :)
    +1
    Unlike
  • Pookisoo:
    @afmtgn, is there anything i can do about it?
    +1
    Unlike
  • RG:
    @Pookisoo, The refrigerator is a good hospital for tigers.Temperature between 7 and 2 degrees Celsius can stop bacteria. If necessary or if you dare 0 to -2 can also help.Reduce the temperature in a few days from 7 degrees to 2. After that you can reduce further. Feel free to let it sit for a few weeks. Place the animal in a plastic container with a lid with some air holes. Fill it with some soil and / or leaves. Check regularly whether there is still moisture or ice in this container. At temperatures above 2 degrees, they do not go into hibernation. They will then live on their reserves. Doing nothing is not an option, I speak from experience. You can avoid these kinds of problems by keeping them fairly dry for much of the year.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Paige1warren:
    Hi guys! I’m new to this site and a new axolotl owner. I’ve had my baby (his name is toothpick) for about a month or so now. I finally got a water testing kit and I tested the perimeters earlier today. My ammonia was at 3 ppm and my nitrite was at 2 ppm. This freaked me out because I know they are supposed to be at 0 ppm. I did a water change a little bit ago and it went down to ammonia 1 ppm and in between 1-2 ppm nitrate. I change 50% of my water weekly and clean up any pieces of waste or excess food with a turkey bastwr everyday. Could this just be because the tank isn’t fully cycled yet? Should I be concerned? Toothpick hasn’t shown any signs of distress
    +1
    Unlike
  • Pookisoo:
    @RG, yeah.. im a new owner and i thought just giving salt baths would work, Thank you so much for this tho!🤗
    +1
    Unlike
  • Pookisoo:
    Sorry again... but when i take him out is he supposed to be moving funny..? Sorry hahaha🤕
    +1
    Unlike
  • madcaplaughs:
    @Paige1warren You need to tub your axolotl and perform 100% daily water changes. Your tank is not fully cycled, and any readings of ammonia or nitrite are toxic and potentially deadly. A fully cycled tank should at all times have readings of 0ppm ammonia/0ppm nitrite/0pmm<nitrate.
    +1
    Unlike
    madcaplaughs: @Paige1warren You need to tub your axolotl and perform 100% daily water changes. Your tank is... +1
    Top