Caudata.org Grant Poll

Which Project should get the 2009 Caudata.org Grant? (READ THIS ENTIRE THREAD BEFORE VOTING)

  • Distributional modelling and ecological research on Salamandra algira in Morocco with emphasis on di

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Effect of magnetic nanoparticles on newt behavior - Notophthalmus viridescens

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Conservation status and systematics of Chiropterotriton multidentatus (Caudata: Plethodontidae) - Ch

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Is chytridiomycosis affecting Appalachian salamanders? - Appalachian salamanders

    Votes: 2 10.0%
  • Habitat preferences of the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) within its refugee’s canals - Axolotl/Ambys

    Votes: 1 5.0%
  • Pandi mushroom-tongue salamander Project: Conservation status assessment of a threatened Andean sala

    Votes: 2 10.0%
  • Comparative landscape genetics of two amphibians endemic to the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt of Centr

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Systematics of the Pseudoeurycea cephalica group - Pseudoeurycea cephalica

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Conservation Genetics of Hellbender Salamanders in New York: the use of mtDNA for Population Structu

    Votes: 6 30.0%
  • The Salamanders of the Valley de Sibundoy-Mocoa (Putumayo, Colombia) transect - Colombian Bolitoglos

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Continued Surveys for the Fungal Pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Georgia Salamander Assem

    Votes: 4 20.0%
  • Systematics and phylogeny of the species complex Bolitoglossa franklini / lincolni (Caudata: Plethod

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Variation in Four-toed Salamander, Hemidactylium scutatum, Microhabitat Use Across Age Groups and Se

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Population status, presence of Batrachochythridium dendrobatidis (Bd) and the effect of the Transoce

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Survey and assessment of aquatic salamander species in the French Creek Drainage of the Allegheny Ba

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Captive propagation of Endangered Guatemalan Salamanders - Guatemalan Bolitoglossa

    Votes: 3 15.0%
  • Survey of Chytrid fungus presence on the three species of salamanders in Peru - Bd in Peru

    Votes: 2 10.0%

  • Total voters
    20
  • Poll closed .
Status
Not open for further replies.

John

Founder
Staff member
Joined
Feb 6, 2001
Messages
7,981
Reaction score
59
Points
48
Age
43
Location
USA
Country
Ireland
Display Name
John Clare
Jan, do you still have your grid? It sounds like you were very thorough. I would agree with every aspect you discussed with the exception of the last one - broad application to all caudates would be nice but for $1000 I don't think we should dwell on the "broadness" - significance to a target species has its own merits too. I'd very much like to see your grid prior to the "broad applicability" criterion.
 

freves

Active member
Joined
Dec 8, 2003
Messages
1,061
Reaction score
20
Points
38
Age
52
Location
Virginia
Country
United States
Display Name
Foster Reves
I had a difficult time deciding between 4 and 9. I ultimately went with 4. This work will be taking place regionally speaking in my own backyard so I think that it is important to know if chytrid is present and if so to what extent. The choice was not easy to make however as I have a true fondness for hellbenders as well. Also, I'll have to admit that the hobbyist in me was wanting to vote for the one dealing with Bolitoglossa breeding however in the grand scheme of things I think that environmental studies should come first.
Chip
 

coendeurloo

New member
Joined
Feb 9, 2006
Messages
357
Reaction score
14
Points
0
Age
37
Location
Scharendijke
Country
Netherlands
Display Name
Coen Deurloo
#4 Is chytridiomycosis affecting Appalachian salamanders?

That one sounded like a *really* valuable research to me, as far as I can understand it.
 

Jan

Site Contributor
Joined
Mar 3, 2006
Messages
1,626
Reaction score
32
Points
0
Location
Philadelphia, PA
Country
United States
Jan, do you still have your grid? It sounds like you were very thorough. I would agree with every aspect you discussed with the exception of the last one - broad application to all caudates would be nice but for $1000 I don't think we should dwell on the "broadness" - significance to a target species has its own merits too. I'd very much like to see your grid prior to the "broad applicability" criterion.
John, please note from my post that I indicated that broad applicability was a subjective assessment not a criterion and thus not a part of the grid. For the grid, I used the 6 main requirements as outlined in the application - objective assessment. I would agree that broad applicability is not necessarily a driver....but in my opinion, when all else is reasonably equal - it is persuasive.
 

John

Founder
Staff member
Joined
Feb 6, 2001
Messages
7,981
Reaction score
59
Points
48
Age
43
Location
USA
Country
Ireland
Display Name
John Clare
John, please note from my post that I indicated that broad applicability was a subjective assessment not a criterion and thus not a part of the grid. For the grid, I used the 6 main requirements as outlined in the application - objective assessment. I would agree that broad applicability is not necessarily a driver....but in my opinion, when all else is reasonably equal - it is persuasive.
Jan, don't hold back, where is this grid :) ?
 

Jennewt

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 27, 2005
Messages
12,407
Reaction score
74
Points
48
Location
USA
Country
United States
Jan, can you tell us which 6 you found to fulfill all 6 of the objective criteria?
 

benw

New member
Joined
Mar 2, 2008
Messages
285
Reaction score
14
Points
0
Location
Dorset
Country
United Kingdom
Display Name
sonic
I voted for the chytrid fungus testing on sals in Peru, mainly for the fact we all know the effects this fungus is having on the amphibian population, and more importantly to me, that the money we raised covers the WHOLE project rather than a proportion, and i like the idea that we, as a community, could make a complete difference to the sals in that area, and that it was a Caudata funded project.

Ben
 

Jan

Site Contributor
Joined
Mar 3, 2006
Messages
1,626
Reaction score
32
Points
0
Location
Philadelphia, PA
Country
United States
Jan, don't hold back, where is this grid :) ?
John darlin' - I would never hold out on you :). I am out of town and the grid is on my desk in my office at home...and it is handwritten, not typed. When I get home tonight, I can minimally relay the 6 that met requirements.
 

Jan

Site Contributor
Joined
Mar 3, 2006
Messages
1,626
Reaction score
32
Points
0
Location
Philadelphia, PA
Country
United States
From re-reviewing the grid, there were eight applications that satisfied all of the requirements: these were #2, #4, #9, #10, #11, #14, #15 and #17. The differentiator among these, in my opinion, was the requirement of ‘dissemination of results’ – how will the research results be disseminated? As I stated, my bias is for results to be presented at meetings and submitted to (and hopefully published in) peer reviewed journals…scrutinized science undertaking with wider audience exposure. To that end, there were three that indicated both methods of dissemination would be pursued: #2, #9 and #11. The others either mentioned just one method or were vague, e.g., ‘data will be published’…. which left me wondering, where? And the answer to that can vary widely and may lack significance. In my final selection, I voted for the one that IMO gave the best ROI.
 

John

Founder
Staff member
Joined
Feb 6, 2001
Messages
7,981
Reaction score
59
Points
48
Age
43
Location
USA
Country
Ireland
Display Name
John Clare
Jan, thank you. I think you're being somewhat unfair with the "where will it be published" part. Most scientists wouldn't publish quality projects outside of peer-reviewed journals - to do so doesn't really help one's CV, one's perception in the eyes of one's employer, or one's prospects for an upward career trajectory within academia.

Here are my opinions as promised. Please undertand that I am giving a short honest assessment of each project and that I tend not to minse words - please understand that I intend no offence!

  1. Salamandra algira - Despite my personal fondness for Wouter Beukema, we state in our grant that we favour those working with species in their own country so this makes this otherwise interesting research take a back seat to many of the other applications.
  2. Nanoparticles and Notophthalmus - I have some professional knowledge of Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials because of where I work. I am quite curious about this research but I do not see it being a priority for conservation in comparison to the other research grant topics here.
  3. Conservation of Chiropterotriton multidentatus - I think this project would provide valuable information for conservation, although the budget area is vague. This would be in my list of those to be considered.
  4. Chytrid in Appalachian salamanders? - A nice interesting project, though I'm not sure how much it will really contribute to conservation (as the answer is likely to be yes to all the species in my opinion), though it may help us target those species that need more protection than others. This would be in my list of those to be considered.
  5. Axolotl Habitat Preferences - Interesting project but I don't think habitat preference is something that needs to be funded for the axolotl - habitat preservation, pollution reduction and mitigation, removal of predatory fish species, and controlled captive breeding in a local environment are priorities for this species and I am very disappointed we did not receive more applications to help this species. If this animal were not so threatened I would feel better about funding this project but it just doesn't seem appropriate. Aside from this, there is no mention of publication of the results so this would not be on my list, despite how much interest I have in this species.
  6. Bolitoglossa pandi - I think assessment of this species would be a worthwhile endeavour but there is no mention of mode of publication. Still, this would be on my list of projects to consider because of the conservation value.
  7. Mexico Ambystoma & Pseudoeurycea - I like this project and I think the results garnered from this work could be quite interesting. My concern though is that I don't see significant potential conservation data coming from this (again, just my opinion). For that reason I wouldn't consider this a primary candidate for my vote.
  8. Pseudoeurycea cephalica - Again, this falls into the same category as number 7 in my opinion: interesting and worthwhile work but not much immediate conservation value. This project would not be a primary candidate for my vote.
  9. Hellbender/Cryptobranchus alleganiensis - Hellbender populations are having a very hard time particularly in the Ozark mountains (not the region of study for this project, I should point out). There is a huge shortfall in our knowledge of this species. Aside from the potential to help the study populations, this project could yield data that would potentially help the conservation and understanding of Hellbender populations elsewhere. I very much like the detail given in the project, the timeline and publication prospects. I consider this application a strong contender for my vote.
  10. Colombian Bolitoglossa - Population information and assessment of "what is where" is valuable data. If we don't have a comparison to historical records, how can we know if a species is in decline? However for immediate conservation value I believe this project falls into the same category as #7, for example. It would not be a strong contender for my vote.
  11. Bd in Georgia, USA - I view this project similarly to #4 (also about chytrid) but the current application has more clearly stated conservation goals and as a result I would consider it more vote-worthy than #4 and certainly in my list of contenders.
  12. Bolitoglossa franklini - This is interesting work on the genetics of these salamander but it has little or no immediate conservation value and I would not consider it a contender for my vote.
  13. Hemidactylium scutatum - This species has particular habitat requirements, particularly for breeding and has suffered from habitat drainage/destruction over much of its range. It also hasn't received much attention in comparison to other species. Illinois, USA, where this project will take place, represents some of the western-most range of this salamander. At a state level, obviously the conservation of this species should be given importance considering the state is not a stronghold for the species. The data from this project may provide information that could aid conservation but frankly I don't see it having a significant conservational impact (again, my opinion with limited knowledge). However I would consider voting for it.
  14. Peru Bolitoglossa - This is another population assessment with two twists - firstly the research will test for Chytrid in the surveyed salamanders, and secondly there is a major construction project underway that will almost certainly affect some populations of the target species. This assessment would have a more immediate impact on conservation than some of the others presented here because of the immediate construction threat. However whether or not anyone could (or would have the money to) do anything about population damage is another matter. I would consider voting for this project.
  15. Hellbender/Cryptobranchus a. alleganiensis and Mudpuppy/Necturus maculosus - This is another population assessment project. Frankly, from a value for money point of view, I don't think $1000 for 2.5 days of survey time is good bang for buck. For that cost I would have hoped for something more tangible in respect to conservation. I don't think I would consider this a leading contender for my vote.
  16. Guatemalan Bolitoglossa - Captive propogation of threatened species. Captive breeding of threatened species is an admirable goal but I would very much like to hear what has made these species so threatened in the wild to warrant this captive breeding. I would also like to hear about conservation efforts. I am also somewhat dismayed by the fact that this application makes it seem as if nothing is known about the breeding biology of these salamanders (which I am willing to accept). Therefore I find myself questioning the value of undertaking such work bearing in mind how little knowledge there is to begin with. I don't wish to descriminate against species, but I would rather vote for a project that has an achieveable goal over one with a (seemingly) remote chance of success, in the near term at least. Aside from all of this, there is no mention made of publication of the results. I would not consider this a primary candidate for my vote.
  17. Bd in Peru - Population assessment and survey for the presence of chytrid fungus. I don't see immediate conservation implications but the data could be useful for future conservation efforts. Otherwise the application meets our requirements and I would consider voting for it.
So, to summarise, the projects I would consider for my vote are: #3, #4, #6, #9, #10, #11, #13, #14, #17.

For myself, I've whittled the list down to three choices: #9, #11, #14.
 

Greatwtehunter

New member
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
2,297
Reaction score
64
Points
0
Age
38
Location
Roanoke, VA
Country
United States
Display Name
Justin
Ok so I'll throw my hat in the ring. I've been trying to decide between 4, 11, and 13. I am strongly leaning towards #4 but I don't wanna vote for it quite yet cause I kinda feel biased since it's pratically in my backyard as well. Being from this region though I could see some of the benefits as some species here only have 2, 3, or 4 county ranges. As quick as chytrid has spread in some areas it wouldn't take no time to wipe out these species.

Oh well, I may make up my mind one of these days before voting is over with.:rolleyes:
 

Jan

Site Contributor
Joined
Mar 3, 2006
Messages
1,626
Reaction score
32
Points
0
Location
Philadelphia, PA
Country
United States
Jan, thank you. I think you're being somewhat unfair with the "where will it be published" part. Most scientists wouldn't publish quality projects outside of peer-reviewed journals - to do so doesn't really help one's CV, one's perception in the eyes of one's employer, or one's prospects for an upward career trajectory within academia.


For myself, I've whittled the list down to three choices: #9, #11, #14.
John, appreciate your comment but we will have to agree to disagree. My comments were about 'dissimination of results'. Specificity and clarity IMO trumps what 'most' may do as there are 'those' that don't. I can only hold someone accountable to what they say they will do,,,,not what I assume they may do. But this isn't about us, it's about where we will award our money.

Your opinions, considerations and insight on each proposal are much appreciated - thanks for putting this together - it is quite valuable. Ultimately, it appears that we have landed on and favor the same grant applications.
 

Azhael

Site Contributor
Joined
May 7, 2007
Messages
6,645
Reaction score
88
Points
0
Location
Burgos
Country
Spain
Display Name
Rodrigo
Although i´m inclined to be appealed by number 16, i´m not convinced by it...
It may be a bit of a silly reason to decide which project to vote, but after seeing Nick Baker´s program on hellbenders some time ago, i can´t help but vote for number 9.....it´s still in my head :S.
 

cichlidjedi

Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2008
Messages
97
Reaction score
6
Points
8
Age
48
Location
Chicago, IL
Country
United States
Display Name
cichlidjedi
I would like to vote for #9 to help out the hellbenders
 

John

Founder
Staff member
Joined
Feb 6, 2001
Messages
7,981
Reaction score
59
Points
48
Age
43
Location
USA
Country
Ireland
Display Name
John Clare
I would like to vote for #9 to help out the hellbenders
Only people who donated to the grant in December are eligible to vote in this though.
 

cichlidjedi

Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2008
Messages
97
Reaction score
6
Points
8
Age
48
Location
Chicago, IL
Country
United States
Display Name
cichlidjedi
Sorry I thought it was for those that donated to Amphibian Ark? Sorry again my mistake.
 

John

Founder
Staff member
Joined
Feb 6, 2001
Messages
7,981
Reaction score
59
Points
48
Age
43
Location
USA
Country
Ireland
Display Name
John Clare
Sorry I thought it was for those that donated to Amphibian Ark? Sorry again my mistake.
Did you do it as part of our donations drive? If so you should have received an email from AArk containing a thank you for participating in the Caudata.org Donations Drive. Send that to me and we can flag you so you can vote.
 

John

Founder
Staff member
Joined
Feb 6, 2001
Messages
7,981
Reaction score
59
Points
48
Age
43
Location
USA
Country
Ireland
Display Name
John Clare
cichlidjedi was one of the donors to the drive and he didn't get flagged - sorry about that. If anyone else has this problem please let me know (unfortunately I am only human!).
 

John

Founder
Staff member
Joined
Feb 6, 2001
Messages
7,981
Reaction score
59
Points
48
Age
43
Location
USA
Country
Ireland
Display Name
John Clare
With 5 days left to go, right now we have a clear leader. I don't think we'll need another poll if this keeps up. However I remind those who have yet to vote (which is at least half of the voters) that you have 5 days remaining.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
General chit-chat
Help Users
  • No one is chatting at the moment.
  • Chat Bot:
    Lonewolf has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Lanalotl:
    Hi I recently rescued a lotl (i did weeks of research before rescuing) Hes mabey 5 or 6 years of age..the previous owner could not remember the exact age of him. I got him from her as he was or had been picked on by his tank mate another lotl who was bough with him from every younger age, I noticed one of his gills, a middle one at the end had split in two? And is slightly more floppy? He also appears or mabey I'm just over worried to mabey have lost some feathers, is that normal to lose some?...all levels in the tank are fine, but wondered if theres and advice anyone could give me as an experienced owner to a new one.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Axolotl Queen:
    @Lanalotl Sounds like the gills may have been nipped by the tank mate. If he is in his own tank and the parameters etc are all good, then he should grow them back and they should go back to full health and strength. However, depending on how old the injury is they may not fully grow back if they have been constantly nipped at.
    +2
    Unlike
  • Smknmom421:
    Can anyone tell me why this is happening? We just did a water change and after freaking out and whipping around the tank, an hour later they look like this. It won't let me send a pic. The edges of their gills are white and it looks like they have skin shedding off
    +1
    Unlike
  • Murk:
    That sounds like severe skin damage. If you post a thread on the forum, you can attach pictures.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Murk:
    It sounds like something went wrong with the water change, so this could be very dangerous. Did you use a dechlorinator? Could it be there are traces of chlorine or soap in the water? (Or for example, in the bucket you used?)
    +1
    Unlike
  • Murk:
    Normally, I would recommend taking them out of the tank asap and putting them in a tub with fresh water, but if there's something wrong with your tap water or dechlorinator, that might not help either. Do you have acces to bottled water or rain water?
    +1
    Unlike
  • Sal22:
    I think my axie is dying, he’s never had any issues before, I’ve had him 3 years, today I noticed some fluffy looking stuff coming from his genital area so I took him out of his tank and did a full tank clean to make sure the water wasn’t infected as I thought it was fungus and then I noticed he had a cut on his belly which was only small about 5 hours ago and now it’s spread to all of his belly, what do I do I’m freaking out
    +1
    Unlike
  • Sal22:
    Update about my axie, unfortunately he has died over night, he looked as if he was bruised allover his belly, his mucus layer had also started to come off.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Ganaa:
    Anyone here from DMV?
    +1
    Unlike
  • Unlike
  • AlexisJG:
    Hi I have 2 4in juveniles (I’ve had them about 2 weeks and they are doing well I think they’ve grown a little already honestly) but I am supposed to go on a 5-6 day vacation in October about 3-4 months from now. I am wondering how I should go about their care when I am gone. I thought about putting them in separate (fairly big) containers with live plants and/or bubblers with a fan in the dark and either fridging them (my last plan) but I am hoping to to either have someone I trust come feed them and turkey baste waste out or just leave them out and clean the containers before we leave and have someone come check on them once or twice. Does any of this sound like a good or bad idea? I want the best for them. All help appreciated :)
    +1
    Unlike
  • Ganaa:
    @patrickstar116, do you still have your fire salamanders?
    +1
    Unlike
  • patrickstar116:
    @Ganaa, I do you may message me if you wish
    +1
    Unlike
  • HalfDrunkToast:
    hi.....
    +1
    Unlike
  • JDeslippe21:
    Hi, so I have 2 male axolotls and about an hour ago they were both perfectly fine and now only one of them has his tail curling up and his gills are slightly curled?? But other than that they’re both acting normally
    +1
    Unlike
  • Murk:
    Could be he's just excited, spooked or temporarily stressed, which could pass in a few hours. It could also be an indicator of other problems. Do you have any recent water parameters?
    +1
    Unlike
  • AlexisJG:
    Does anyone have any idea how to help with high ammonia levels? I have the API freshwater master kit and everything else’s test results were great besides ammonia. I did a 50% water change and I use API products including ammonia lock.
    +1
    Unlike
  • MuggleMiChu:
    Help! I got my first axolotl two days ago and they have stopped eating. They ate a few frozen blood worms the first day and haven’t eaten or been interested in food since. I feed them frozen blood worms and the tank is around 64 degrees. I do have a filter that moves sometimes and I noticed them swimming up to it, I have a new filter and a fan coming today or tomorrow. I leave the worms in the tank or a little bit before taking them out so I don’t know if they ate when I wasn’t looking. I know it takes a while for them to digest. Does anyone have any tips or knowledge they can share? The pet store I bought them from didn’t have gravel or sand in the tank so I’m not sure if theres an issue or if I’m just impatient. Thank you!
    +1
    Unlike
  • HalfDrunkToast:
    @MuggleMiChu, how big they are? also for substrate, i would not do gravel at all I would either do sand or none at all!
    +1
    Unlike
  • MuggleMiChu:
    They are about 2-3 inches long and I have them in a bare bottom tank
    +1
    Unlike
  • HalfDrunkToast:
    @MuggleMiChu I would say try live black/blood worms untell they are full or just turn there head away ( that's what mine do) if that does not work try to get some live brine shrimp and see if they eat that. baby axolotl prefer live food over frozen food as the frozen food is too cold for them or they can't eat it in one go( that's if you do the blocks) mine eat chopped up frozen thawed shrimp. as for them not eating from what I have experienced with my second axolotl, I got her when she was about an inch long and she ate every day, when they start getting 3-4 inches long they will gradually slow down there eating. and if you really want to do substrate I would do sand because if they do ingest a little bit it won't hurt them.
    +1
    Unlike
  • MuggleMiChu:
    Thank you so much for the information and advice! They are eating again, they ate a lot today. I think it might have been stress from the move or digesting old food, I also noticed they ate some of the food left in the tank (I removed the rest). I’m going to keep the tank bare bottom.
    +2
    Unlike
  • HalfDrunkToast:
    @MuggleMiChu,your so welcome im glad to be of help! and I'm glad that they are eating as well!
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    AidanD has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
    Chat Bot: AidanD has left the room. +1
    Top