Eddie & Elektra lay eggs!

Otterwoman

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HI Revan,
Your larva looks so different from mine! Mine are so dark, yours is lighter. Mine were lighter when younger.
I think there are numerous factors in trying to predict metamorphosis. One that I've noticed with this batch is water quality. I have two tanks, one large with many larvae, one small with just a few (the few I am keeping). The larger one I was reluctant to clean/ siphon much because I didn't want to suck up larvae and hurt them. Now that they're bigger this has changed, though. But I think it contributed to the earlier metamorphosis of some of the larvae in the larger tank. They have smaller gills too, and their tank has less oxygen going than the other tank: one airstone for the larger tank vs. one airstone for the smaller tank. I think temperature is definitely a factor too, though in this case it's not a variable between tanks.

Now, I don't think that the larger tank is unhealthy for its different parameters; it's not like the tank was filthy or there's not enough air. The gills are only slightly smaller. The individuals look large and healthy and are active and feed very well. I don't think these are any different than parameters the animals would encounter from pond to pond where they might develop in the wild, and these animals are well adapted to deal with the variety of conditions they might end up in, in the wild. In fact, the second smaller tank is cleaner than any tank I've raised any species in so far; my method has been (for the very few years I've been doing this) a tank so "dirty" that I can't even really tell how many larvae I have until they all morph. The second, smaller tank is so clean because it was the tank I kept the adults in, these are larvae from eggs I didn't find to transfer to the egg tank/hatchery and ended up growing up with the parents, Eddie and Elektra, who I only recently moved into a different tank back up to the living room from the basement where most of my newt stuff is. I just missed them too much and it cooled off enough to bring them back up. So now these "overlooked" larvae are alone in a tank in the basment (That's the tank that Hector is in, I'm keeping the ones from the smaller tank).

Another factor that would change the morphing schedule is food, quality and quantity. I'm sure there are more but that's all I can think of right now. Just ballpark guessing, the larva in your picture looks similar to the larvae I pictured at about a month after hatching. That's 30 days vs. your 82. But keep in mind that's just a guess from the pictures.

And that, my friends, is making a short story long.
 
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Revan

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What temperature are they kept at, Revan? They should be at around 23 C (in my experience), and lower temperatures can result in symptoms similar to those you have described, as do overly high temps (as John has commented). Try feeding them on small/chopped earthworm to boost growth.

Chris
They are kept at 22C at present, temperature does vary and can go upto 24-25. However i must say, they are much more active whilst eating when it is warmer. All they are fed at present are frozen bloodworms. I will look at getting some earthworms. Thanks for the comment Chris.
 

Revan

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HI Revan,
Your larva looks so different from mine! Mine are so dark, yours is lighter. Mine were lighter when younger.
I think there are numerous factors in trying to predict metamorphosis. One that I've noticed with this batch is water quality. I have two tanks, one large with many larvae, one small with just a few (the few I am keeping). The larger one I was reluctant to clean/ siphon much because I didn't want to suck up larvae and hurt them. Now that they're bigger this has changed, though. But I think it contributed to the earlier metamorphosis of some of the larvae in the larger tank. They have smaller gills too, and their tank has less oxygen going than the other tank: one airstone for the larger tank vs. one airstone for the smaller tank. I think temperature is definitely a factor too, though in this case it's not a variable between tanks.

Now, I don't think that the larger tank is unhealthy for its different parameters; it's not like the tank was filthy or there's not enough air. The gills are only slightly smaller. The individuals look large and healthy and are active and feed very well. I don't think these are any different than parameters the animals would encounter from pond to pond where they might develop in the wild, and these animals are well adapted to deal with the variety of conditions they might end up in, in the wild. In fact, the second smaller tank is cleaner than any tank I've raised any species in so far; my method has been (for the very few years I've been doing this) a tank so "dirty" that I can't even really tell how many larvae I have until they all morph. The second, smaller tank is so clean because it was the tank I kept the adults in, these are larvae from eggs I didn't find to transfer to the egg tank/hatchery and ended up growing up with the parents, Eddie and Elektra, who I only recently moved into a different tank back up to the living room from the basement where most of my newt stuff is. I just missed them too much and it cooled off enough to bring them back up. So now these "overlooked" larvae are alone in a tank in the basment (That's the tank that Hector is in, I'm keeping the ones from the smaller tank).

Another factor that would change the morphing schedule is food, quality and quantity. I'm sure there are more but that's all I can think of right now. Just ballpark guessing, the larva in your picture looks similar to the larvae I pictured at about a month after hatching. That's 30 days vs. your 82. But keep in mind that's just a guess from the pictures.

And that, my friends, is making a short story long.
Thanks for the response. I do have dark variants as well as the lighter one pictured. However 70% are of lighter variant at present.

I currently change the water daily, I change it entirely and clean the containers. The water gets quite dirty.

Also when i feed, the smaller larvae eat around 2-3 frozen bloodworms a day, and the larger ones tend to eat 4-5 a day. (yes i count as they are entirely hand fed :D)

Perhaps as Chris has said, I will have to change the diet, can earth worms be purchased frozen? As I'm not the best at chopping up live worms :(
 

Otterwoman

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Earthworms turn into mush when frozen, in my experience. Do you have access to (live) blackworms?
 

Revan

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I'll check at the local bate shop, if they're used for fishing i should be able to get some.
 

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Well, to conclude this thread, here's a last picture. About 50 babies have morphed already, and there are another 20 or more left. It's been a very successful summer! Four months from eggs to 3/4 of the offspring having morphed. I wonder what next summer has in store!
 

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Greatwtehunter

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Congratulations Dawn on a successful summer. I thorthly(sp) enjoyed watching your babies grow up, they are quite the lookers by the way. Good luck next year.

Later,
Justin
 

IanF

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Daniel

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Why the h*** didn't any of those crawl into the parcel you sent me? :cool:

Beautiful breed, Dawn!
 

Otterwoman

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They grow up so quickly!

They're almost big enough to give Eddie and Elektra a run for their money. These are the four I'm keeping: Hektor, Helen, Cassandra, and Ajax. Of course, I have no idea what their real sexes are, but on the other hand, they have no idea what their names are.
 

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Raylan

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They're very nice looking, I've enjoyed reading this, have fun with them!:D
 

Otterwoman

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Let's see if I'm psychic...last year before Elektra laid, she was eating for two, and Eddie wouldn't eat at all. Elektra is now eating like a pig (though she always does), and Eddie is off his worms. We'll see if she lays soon.
Isn't that strange, that you could predict the egg-laying readiness of a pair by the male's appetite...
 

freves

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Good luck Dawn. I have not checked this thread in a while. The juveniles look great.
Chip
 

caudatadude28

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Can T. verr. juvies be housed semi aquaticly? What do you feed them? Good luck!
 

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Its risky to force a juvenile to become aquatic, they can drown. I'm keeping mine terrestrial for atleast a year with a little water bowl. After a year I'll give them the choice of becoming aquatic with a 50/50 set up. I'll say just let them choose their own lifestyle and don't force it. I've had little ones drown on me.
 

Otterwoman

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Can T. verr. juvies be housed semi aquaticly? What do you feed them? Good luck!
Its risky to force a juvenile to become aquatic, they can drown. I'm keeping mine terrestrial for atleast a year with a little water bowl. After a year I'll give them the choice of becoming aquatic with a 50/50 set up. I'll say just let them choose their own lifestyle and don't force it. I've had little ones drown on me.
thanks Jaymes. And also, I feed mine whiteworms and cut up earthworms. I'm trying to get them to eat by hand but I'm not successful as I'm not trying hard enough.
 

troutnerd

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thanks Jaymes. And also, I feed mine whiteworms and cut up earthworms. I'm trying to get them to eat by hand but I'm not successful as I'm not trying hard enough.
I've found two of my young T.verr...like the water..and will feed completely submerged..but I still keep the water shallow.I've tilted two 2.5 gallon tanks so that half the glass is out of the water.
 
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